How To Automatically Save Every Link You Share In One Place

04 Sep
September 4, 2014

Did you know that 1 million links are shared every 20 minutes on Facebook?

Add to that the millions of links shared across Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, Pinterest and other networks, and that is an overwhelming amount of information that people are pushing.

I share a lot of content each day, and one of the challenges I have found in the past is being able to easily recall where and when I shared information if I want to refer back to it.

Last week I shared an IFTTT recipe I use to capture ideas for blog posts, and this week I wanted to share a few more that I use to bring together all of the links I share into one easy to use repository. It’s not complex, and it creates a searchable index of all links you share across all the platforms you use.

My main networks are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, where I will reshare information I find in while browsing each platform. But I also use tools like Buffer to share links out.

You will need to be using Pocket to make it work (one of my favourite apps for managing throughput). It’s based on link posts shared to each network.

So what does the recipe look like?  Make sure you enable each platform in the IFTTT app, and make the trigger in each:

  • Facebook: New link post by you
  • LinkedIn: New shared link By you
  • Twitter: New link by you

In each case, the Action is the same:

  • Pocket: Save for later

The recipes should then look like this: facebooklinkrecipe twitterlinkrecipe

The Buffer recipe works in the same way, but is a little bit different. Because I always share to Twitter and the same link selectively to LinkedIn via Buffer, I have only set it up to capture a share to Twitter from here.

buffer

And that’s pretty much it. Now when you check back into your Pocket app, you will find the links you have shared socially, tagged with each platform they have been shared from.

PHOTO – C/N N/G via Flickr

A Handy IFTTT Recipe for Blog Ideas

18 Aug
August 18, 2014

I’m spending more time lately finding ways to make IFTTT work smarter for me to automate a whole bunch of tasks. For those not familiar with it, IFTTT allows you to create recipes – links between different channels that have a trigger and an action (hence the name IFTTT – If This Then That).

I often find stories online that I have a point of view on and want to write a post about. In the past, I have saved them to Pocket and come back to them at a later stage.

This takes me a step further. The recipe looks like this:

iftttrecipe

So the trigger for this is Pocket (you can also use Instapaper or any other Read Later service it supports), and you are going to link it to WordPress. If you haven’t previously activated these channels you will need to login to both via IFTTT to set them up and grant permissions.

recipeIn the recipe, you will want to designate a tag in Pocket to send posts to WordPress. Give it a tag of “blog” or “blog ideas”, or whatever is easiest and then add WordPress to the recipe and tell it to create a new post (this will be your only post option at this point).

The next piece is important.

You will need to make sure you edit the recipe once established – you want it to be a draft, otherwise you’re just publishing a post with the name and snippet of the article.

Click on the completed recipe in your list and then EDIT. Scroll down and there will be a “Post Status” box. Click on this and change to “Save As Draft”.draft

Now every time you add an article to Pocket with the tag ‘Blog’, it will automatically create a draft post in WordPress with reference to the original article so you can begin to build your posts around it.

Anyone else got some other great IFTTT recipes for blogging? Share them with me!

PHOTO – Casey Bisson

What a Great Customer Experience Can Look Like

10 Aug
August 10, 2014

A quick post to highlight a fantastic customer experience I had last week.

I tweeted Ann Handley from Marketing Profs to ask if her new book Everybody Writes will be available in Australia at the same time as the US. Sure, I could just buy on Kindle, or order from Amazon, but I sometimes prefer a hard copy and like to support local where I can.

I really enjoyed Content Rules, Ann’s last book, so am naturally keen to read this one.

I could explain the rest of the exchange, but I’ll let Twitter do that:

This to me is a perfect customer experience – a referral from a trusted source, the surprise and delight of a price offer, quick resolution of a small issue and ultimately a sale.

All handled via Twitter. I pay about what I would pay from Amazon, and a local business has a new customer.

Couldn’t have been more straightforward.

What are the lessons here?

  • Always be listening for opportunities
  • Where possible, do something unexpected that the customer will love
  • Always be willing to follow up

PHOTO - Mark JP via Flickr

3 Social Service Tips For Those That Don’t Offer It

28 Jul
July 28, 2014

Despite that fact that social media is becoming the new megaphone for customer complaints and issues, not every business has made the jump to serving customers via social channels.

Many prefer to engage with them through content that promotes the brand and engages people on their pages, rather than supporting it. According to one study, only 39% offer service on Twitter despite 76% of companies actually using it.

The reality though is different – yes, people are talking about you, and that also means people are complaining about you, and people expect some sort of response.

In a separate piece of research, 53% of people who tweeted a company expected a response within the hour. Increasing customer expectations have now grown that to 72% according to research from Lithium Technologies. Both of these were covered in an excellent article on Hubspot dealing with social response times.

Even if you are not using it, it pays to have a fundamental understanding of how social customer service works, and how to deal with it.

An encounter I had with a wine retailer last week on Twitter was a perfect example of a business that doesn’t typically do it.

A bit of background…

Sporadically, and more recently last week, I receive emails from a list that I unsubscribed from about 18 months ago. Usually I just click on unsubscribe, delete and move on, which after the third time I accepted that this was a function that was clearly broken. Once again, breaking up is hard to do.

The last email though got my attention. It was to update my preferences. In it, it had a list of various types of emails they offer, and clearly showed that I was opted out of all emails. Yet they wanted me to check that this is what I wanted to do.

Now, as far as I am concerned, once I am unsubscribed, that’s it. My name is off your list and I don’t want to hear from you again. It shouldn’t be sitting on a database somewhere so I can occasionally hear from you. Yet in this case, it seems exactly that – my name is still on a list.

In my typical first port of call for customer service, I fired off a tweet to them to suggest that they fix the unsubscribe feature before emailing me about managing my preferences for communication.

To their credit they responded, but what followed was a series of tweets that ranged from passing me off to a page on their site to have my query addressed (I don’t want to have to go through an engagement with your account service team to tell your process is broken), to talking to me like opting in and out of email lists is a concept that I should understand, and then suggesting I calm down despite merely highlighting where the problems were.

After this, I looked back over their Twitter stream. They don’t have a separate customer service channel, so this would be the only one that someone can reach them through. It became very apparent that they don’t usually use Twitter to provide customer service other than to reply to praise and basic questions about product, and so my expectations of the exchange lowered.

What it showed though were three things clearly missing from their engagement on Twitter, that I think are valuable lessons for anyone who doesn’t typically offer service through social.

Listen to the Problem

Probably the most fundamental piece of the process is listening, and this doesn’t change for any business, big or small. Not every question is the same, and it shouldn’t be assumed that there is a one size fits all answer.

It took five tweets for them to understand that the issue was with their process of removing people from the list is broken.

It also comes back to the channel – understand that if this is my preferred way of contacting you for resolution, that I don’t want to be pushed somewhere else. Deal with me here.

Don’t Treat the Customer Like an Idiot

During the exchange, I was stepped through the process of how to click an opt out link, and then I “won’t get them anymore…”. The trail off of the sentence suggests that clicking on the opt out should be the logical thing to do, and why hadn’t I thought of it.

Give you customers credit for understanding how processes work. Often times, they are highly digital savvy (if I can work out Twitter, I get email) and familiar with a product that they know more than the person on the other side of the keyboard.

Never assume the problem belongs to the customer alone. Every business has pain points.

Don’t Go on the Offensive

Probably the most important thing is not to lose your cool with the customer. Despite a rational description of the problem and where it was going wrong, I was told there was “no need to get aggressive”.

Nothing will make a rational customer more annoyed than being talked down to.

Remember, today’s consumer has more power than ever before – the power of reach, the power of a voice, and the power of choice with their wallet.

What Next?

So in the end I was removed from the list. I got my outcome, but in a process that took longer than it should have.

While social may not be your primary service channel, or even one you plan on using, understand that people will reach out to you there. Being prepared to deal with it will make for a better customer experience. A happy customer is more likely to come back, and most importantly in the social, more likely to recommend your brand.

UPDATE: CoSchedule has just published a fantastic piece about this very topic, which I think is a must read. Check it out here – Responding to Customer Complaints with Social Media.

Want some more ideas? Here’s a great post from The Next Web on Awesome Customer Service on Social.

PHOTO – 10ch via Flickr

Do You Have A Personal Tone of Voice Guideline for Social Media?

06 Jul
July 6, 2014

So if you read my tweets after about 7.30 on any given night, you’ll know I have an unhealthy appetite for reality TV. If you follow me for a 6 week period over June and July during State of Origin, you’ll know I tend to get very vocal about the game.

I’ll pass judgement on contestants or the other team, because that’s what any supporter would do, and there is a conversation to be part of.

Through all of it though, fired up passion is tempered and guided by what I have deemed my personal social media tone of voice guidelines.

Why is this kind of guideline important?

Those of us who manage corporate social media know the importance of a tone of voice guideline for a brand, one that embodies the spirit and matches the impression we want people to have of the work that gets done.

So why should your personal use be any different?

Every day, your digital footprint is getting bigger, and more of that content is being captured and indexed for all to see. If you’re trying to build a name for yourself, in any industry, this is something you need to be conscious of. Employers are increasingly using social to screen candidates – what will they find when they look at yours?

I’m not talking about a formal document, just a set of guiding principles. For a lot of the time, and I am sure for a lot of people, this is second nature.

My Rules of the Road

There are always considerations before I post anything.

Is what I am about to post likely to offend, or create debate? If it’s the former, why do I need to post it? If it’s the latter, am I willing to engage in the conversation and back it up?

Are there any commercial arrangements with my employer that I need to be aware of? As I have spoken about before, disclaiming your opinions as independent of your employer can mean little, and shouldn’t be used to abdicate responsibility for your actions.

Two smaller considerations – with the exception of Facebook, nothing featuring kids or family. And I never swear on social – it adds nothing, and uses up characters…

Does this take away from your being genuine, being one of the key tenants of social? Absolutely not. You can still be genuine on social media without having to post everything that pops into your head.

It’s Still You

Regardless of what sort of guidelines you have for yourself, it still has to be you. Think about it as aspects of your personality.

I am very deliberate in how I use the channels I am across, and the narrow choice of channels I use makes it easy:

Facebook – A place to be myself. These people know me, they’re friends and family. Privacy settings mean I can disagree and debate, and talk about the things that they expect me to talk about, and perhaps be a little more free and easy than I would be on Twitter.

Twitter – Here, I share my thoughts on a variety of things, posts I find interesting, replies to people I agree or disagree with (guided by the above), and being part of the conversation about things taking place. There’s probably more consideration here about what I post than anywhere else.

LinkedIn – purely professional, here I post stories and links that are all business and represent points of view I think are worthy of sharing. It’s about giving those who follow my updates an insight into how I think business wise.

So that’s it – as I said, it’s not a formal, written policy, as a corporate TOV may be. But it’s no less important to your personal brand to be guided by some principles.

What about you? Do you consider how and what you post in line with beliefs or a tone of voice guideline?

PHOTO – Dwayne via Flickr